Posts tagged "loose tea"

How To Make The Best Iced Tea?

 

Pahadi Tea recommends that you use loose leaf tea for iced tea.

 

Why use loose leaf tea for iced tea

 There are a few reasons why you should consider switching to loose leaf tea for making iced tea:

 

It tastes better: Loose leaf tea is higher quality than most tea bags. Tea bags use fannings and dust, the leftover bits of tea once the good stuff is used.

 

More Variety: When you buy tea bags, you’re limited to a few selections. With loose leaf tea, you have a wider selection. Plus you can blend teas yourself to make you own specialty

 

More affordable: Given the same quality ingredients, loose leaf tea is more affordable than its bagged counterpart.

 

 

HOW TO MAKE THE BEST ICED TEA

1.      Use fresh tea. Look for fresh tea, because the oils that give teas their flavor break down over time. Opt for loose tea rather than tea bags, as tea leaves need room to expand to release their flavors. Look for brands that list the region where the tea comes from so you know exactly what you’re getting.

 

2.      Start with spring or filtered tap water. Mineral water contains too many minerals that can create off-flavors when they come in contact with compounds in the tea leaves, and mineral-free distilled water produces a flat-tasting brew.

 

3.     Turn up (or down) the heat. Use boiling water (212°F) to brew black, herbal and darker-colored oolong teas. But use cooler water (170° to 180°F) to brew green, white and lighter oolongs teas. Brewing teas that need cooler temps with boiling water can result in bitter or astringent flavors.

 

4.      Use just enough tea. Use 1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons per cup of water when brewing teas with bigger leaves or flowers, like green tea or chamomile, and 1 teaspoon per cup for teas with denser, compact leaves, such as most black teas. If you want to make iced tea and don’t have time for the tea to cool down, brew it double-strength to compensate for the resulting water from melting ice cubes. Or cool it to room temperature and refrigerate until cold.

 

5.      Steep long enough to release flavors, but not so long that tannins and other bitter-tasting compounds dominate. Heartier teas, like black teas and darker oolongs, should steep for 3 to 5 minutes, while green, white and lighter oolong teas need just 2 to 3 minutes. Herbal tisanes and infusions have fewer tannins, so there’s less risk of oversteeping.

 

 

Tea Health Tip: Regardless of the variety of tea you brew, maximize the power of its flavonoids by drinking it freshly brewed. If you want to keep a batch of cold tea in your refrigerator, “add a little lemon juice,” recommends Jeffrey Blumberg, Ph.D., director of the Antioxidants Research Laboratory at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. The citric acid and vitamin C in that squeeze of lemon—or lime or orange—help preserve the flavonoids.

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