Posts from category "DARJEELING TEA"

Drink of good health

 

Drink of good health

Tea is commonly consumed as a stimulant and as a refreshing drink at different times of the day. Besides its immediate benefits, tea provides invaluable long term benefits to the human body, which are a subject of ongoing research. All four varieties of tea – black, green, white and oolong – possess remarkable disease fighting properties.

 

First of all it is critical to understand these different tea varieties. While all of them come from the same tea plant, the difference between these varieties lies in their processing methods.

 

For preparation of green tea, the leaves are withered and then steamed or pan fired, before they are rolled and dried. This tea undergoes very little oxidation. Green tea constitutes of catechins (catechin, epicatechin, epigallocatechin, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin gallate) in monomeric form. On the other hand, during black tea manufacturing, both withering and fermentation are carried out. As a result of the oxidation process, the monomeric catechins in green leaves are converted to the aflavins (dimeric form) and the arubigins (oligomeric form) during manufacture of black tea. Flavonoids like kaempferol, quercetin and myricetin glycosides are present in both green and black tea. During the preparation of oolong tea, the leaves are partially fermented. White tea is prepared with the least processing. Immature tea leaves are picked just before their buds open completely. The name comes from the silvery fuzz covering the buds that becomes white after drying.

 

Scientific research has established a strong connection between black tea consumption and health. The human body creates millions of free radicals (molecule/atom with unpaired electron in its outer orbit) on a continuous basis in order to carry out its metabolic process. They need to be checked by antioxidant enzymes in the body or antioxidants in the food that we eat. Excessive presence of free radicals disturbs this balance and causes cell damage that leads to most chronic diseases like arthritis, emphysema and bronchitis, atherosclerosis or heart disease, peptic ulcer in the stomach, type 2 diabetes, kidney problems, liver problems and also aging, which includes wrinkling of skin.

 

Black tea polyphenols neutralize the effect of free radicals. It also has fat burning properties that help boost body metabolism and reduce appetite. Polyphenols in black tea help in the prevention of viral, bacterial and inflammatory reactions. Dimeric and oligomeric catechins present in black tea improve insulin signaling and glucose control that is beneficial in protecting the body from damages caused by excess blood sugar after the onset of type 2 diabetes. Black tea is also a vital defense against cancer and cardiovascular diseases. It has L Theanine, which improves alpha brain wave activity, thereby aiding in relaxation and bringing down stress.

 

Just like black tea, green tea is also rich in antioxidant polyphenols - catechins, flavonols, the aflavins and the arubigins. The most significant departure is the catechin epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), which is found in its highest concentration in green tea and has been found to be a powerful antioxidant. In addition, EGCg has the ability to destroy cancer cells without causing any harm to healthy tissue as well as lower LDL cholesterol and controlling the abnormal functioning of blood clots. It’s also been found to be good for bone health, oral health, weight loss and improvement in brain function.

 

Oolong tea shares common characteristics with both black tea and green tea due to its manufacturing process. It is more suitable for people who prefer a low caffeine option. White tea is considered to be a far greater source of antioxidants than green tea because the leaves undergo minimum processing.

 

 

Health Benefits of Chamomile Tea, Ginger Tea & Chai Tea

Chamomile Tea:

 

Chamomile tea has numerous health benefits on one’s body. It has natural antibacterial effects on your body to help you treat colds and illnesses. Drinking chamomile tea helps you sleep, as it calms your nervous system. Ever get uneasy stomachaches? Well, chamomile tea helps your upset stomach, too, as it relaxes your muscles and intestines, in addition to helping indigestion and irritable bowel syndrome. Chamomile tea can assist with one’s diabetes and hyperglycemia. It promotes healthy skin, works hard to reduce cancer cells, appeases muscle spasms, and can even help to treat some wounds and cuts. So make a meal out of our chamomile!

 

 

Ginger Tea:

 

So many benefits come from the wonders of ginger. Ginger can do so many amazing things, such as helping to fight cancer, soothe irritable bowel syndrome, protect against Alzheimer’s disease, and help you to lose weight. Ginger tea helps with your blood circulation, reduces arthritic inflammation, and eases morning sickness. Stopping motion sickness, providing pain relief, clearing your sinuses, and boosting your metabolism is just the start of some of the incredible benefits of ginger tea. Ginger protects you and is cautious for you, so in other words, it helps you to be naturally gingerly! It calms you, it helps you, it heals you, and, overall, it will ginger you up!

                                          

 

Chai Tea:

 

 

Chai tea is almost always made from an assortment of healthy ingredients, such as cinnamon, ginger, fennel, cardamom, black pepper, cloves, and black tea. Each of these ingredients has different wonderful effects on your body that will assist you with your overall health. Chai tea has an abundant amount of antioxidants that will help you to treat and prevent cancer, as well as cardiovascular disease. It has beneficial anti-inflammatory effects, and helps you with your digestion. It will help you feel relaxed and refreshed, as it enhances your immune system. Please chai this product out- you will be happy you did so!

Health Benefits of Tea - Part I

Health Benefits of Tea - Part I

 

Black Tea:

 

Black tea is made from a bush called Camellia sinensis. This tea contains theophylline, which is a stimulating substance that can make you feel more alert. Black tea naturally has polyphenols, which are antioxidants that help protect your cells from damage. When consuming black tea, it may lower the risk of diabetes, high cholesterol, Parkinson’s disease, and kidney stones. Due to phytochemicals found in this tea, it can cause stronger and healthier bones, as well as lower the chance of getting arthritis. No need to turn your back away from this black tea. So come back to black, and buy black tea!

 

Green Tea:

 

Green tea contains catechins, which are antioxidants that are known to prevent and fight against cell damage. Catechins can help to lower cholesterol and blood pressure in your body. Theanine, a natural chemical found in green tea, provides a calming effect upon your mind and body. Antioxidants in green tea can help to lower the risk of getting cancer. Green tea is also known to help increase one’s brain function over time. This world is now going green, so why don’t you?!

 

White Tea:

 

White tea contains natural antioxidants that help to fight inflammation, improve cardiovascular health, and reduce the risk of chronic diseases, such as cancer. It has antibacterial and antiviral qualities to assist your health overall. White tea can increase bone health throughout your life. It can help to effect and benefit the aging process in the body and mind. White tea also helps to protect one’s heart and circulatory system. Choose the white tea for you, because everything is all white tea here!

 

Oolong Tea:

 

Oolong tea boosts your metabolism, which can help you burn fat faster. It reduces cholesterol levels due to its production of the polyphenol molecule. Oolong tea can increase your mental alertness. It helps with your digestive tract. It can assist with stabilizing blood sugar, building strong bones, and strengthening your immune system. Don’t wait too long to buy our oolong!

Healthtea Living

 

Many people wonder what tea can do for your health. We all know that tea is delicious, but what effects does it have on your body? Well, the health benefits of tea depend upon the type of tea you are consuming. So, without further ado, let me TEAch you about some of the healthy benefits that come with drinking tea!

 

Depending upon the distinct tea you are drinking, you can gain multiple health benefits. Tea has the ability to help with everything from your respiratory system to your digestive system. It can help you relax, feel good, and focus more on what you feel you need to. It even has the ability to lower the risk of obtaining cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. In other words, there are so many beneficial abiliTEAs that this drink provides.

 

How does tea have this effect on one’s body, you ask? Well natural teas, such as the variety Pahadi Tea offers, contain antioxidants that help reduce the risk of such diseases as cancer. The compounds in certain teas, such as green tea, for instance, have this innate ability to help one’s body process sugars better, which is especially beneficial for those with diabetes. Much like milk is believed to do, tea also protects your bones and helps make them strong based upon some of the components that are in certain types of teas. Tea, of course, also helps you to stay hydrated! This is so helpful when coming from places such as Arizona, where Pahadi Tea is located, or India, where we get our products.

 

Tea has so many amazing effects on your body, mind, and spirit. It soothes you in an abundance of ways that help you to stay relaxed and focused, all while gaining a sense of satisfaction. Pahadi Tea offers an incredible assortment of delicious and healthy teas. In other words, we have a true varieTEA! All of our teas that we provide are made fresh from the hills of India, and we put our heart into the product. When you are happy with our tea, it makes Pahadi Tea happy. It is a mutually beneficial relationship.

 

All in all, tea certainly has a multitude of health benefits. Check out our website and different teas for more healthtea information, and please contribute to our Pahadi TEAm!!!

 

 

Turmeric Tea Health Benefits

Turmeric Tea Health Benefits

 

What exactly is turmeric? It’s part of the ginger family and considered a natural botanical compound. The roots are traditionally boiled, dried and ground into a powder. The plant grows to 5-6 feet tall in the tropical regions of Southern Asia with trumpet shaped, yellow flowers.

Turmeric has been used in India for 4,000 years and is a major part of Ayurvedic medicine, which originated in India more than 3,000 years ago and remains one of the country’s traditional health care systems. Its concepts about health and disease promote the use of herbal compounds, special diets, and other unique health practices.

The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in turmeric are mainly attributed to its most active component, Curcumin. This compound is also what gives turmeric is yellow-orange color. 

 

  1. Heart Disease:  Because Curcumin helps stops platelets from clumping together and forming blood clots, turmeric may help blood clots from building up in the arteries. Early studies have suggested that turmeric may prevent atherosclerosis, which is caused by plaque buildup that can cause heart attacks or stroke.

  2. Brain Health: A recent study suggests that Curcumin contains a brain boosting chemical could help slow the progressions of Alzheimer’s by helping hippocampal brain cells grow.  Taking turmeric as a component in an anti-inflammatory diet, can help prevent the risk of Alzheimer’s.  

  3. Cancer:  It has been suggested by early research that Curcumin may help prevent or treat several types of cancers, including prostate, breast, skin and colon cancer. More research is needed to determine whether this is due to its strong antioxidant properties which protect cells from damage.

  4. Indigestion: Studies have found that turmeric reduced symptoms of bloating and gas in people suffering from indigestion. It has been prescribed in Germany as an approved herb to treat digestive issues.

  5. Osteoarthritis: Researchers believe that the anti-inflammatory properties in turmeric can help people with the pain and disability of arthritis. When combined with other herbs such as winter cherry, boswelia and zinc, less pain was reported.

  6. Uveitis: In a study of people with chronic anterior uveitis, an inflammation of the eye’s iris, Curcumin was just as effective as prescribed medication of corticosteroids.

  7. Bacterial and Viral Infections: Turmeric has been shown to kill bacteria and viruses but researchers need to do more studies of this to determine how effective it would be in people. Some apply turmeric to the skin for pain, ringworm, bruising, soreness inside the mouth and infected wounds.

  8. Fat Metabolism and Weight Management: While studies are still preliminary, researchers at Tufts University believe turmeric may help prevent weight gain by blocking absorption of fat.

  9. Anti-Depressant:  In Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric is used as an anti-depressant.

 

Pahadi Turmeric Tea

 Main Ingredients: Turmeric, Holy Basil, Basil leaves, Ginger, Nutmeg, Cinnamon, Cardamom, Cloves, and Almond slices. 

How To Make The Best Iced Tea?

 

Pahadi Tea recommends that you use loose leaf tea for iced tea.

 

Why use loose leaf tea for iced tea

 There are a few reasons why you should consider switching to loose leaf tea for making iced tea:

 

It tastes better: Loose leaf tea is higher quality than most tea bags. Tea bags use fannings and dust, the leftover bits of tea once the good stuff is used.

 

More Variety: When you buy tea bags, you’re limited to a few selections. With loose leaf tea, you have a wider selection. Plus you can blend teas yourself to make you own specialty

 

More affordable: Given the same quality ingredients, loose leaf tea is more affordable than its bagged counterpart.

 

 

HOW TO MAKE THE BEST ICED TEA

1.      Use fresh tea. Look for fresh tea, because the oils that give teas their flavor break down over time. Opt for loose tea rather than tea bags, as tea leaves need room to expand to release their flavors. Look for brands that list the region where the tea comes from so you know exactly what you’re getting.

 

2.      Start with spring or filtered tap water. Mineral water contains too many minerals that can create off-flavors when they come in contact with compounds in the tea leaves, and mineral-free distilled water produces a flat-tasting brew.

 

3.     Turn up (or down) the heat. Use boiling water (212°F) to brew black, herbal and darker-colored oolong teas. But use cooler water (170° to 180°F) to brew green, white and lighter oolongs teas. Brewing teas that need cooler temps with boiling water can result in bitter or astringent flavors.

 

4.      Use just enough tea. Use 1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons per cup of water when brewing teas with bigger leaves or flowers, like green tea or chamomile, and 1 teaspoon per cup for teas with denser, compact leaves, such as most black teas. If you want to make iced tea and don’t have time for the tea to cool down, brew it double-strength to compensate for the resulting water from melting ice cubes. Or cool it to room temperature and refrigerate until cold.

 

5.      Steep long enough to release flavors, but not so long that tannins and other bitter-tasting compounds dominate. Heartier teas, like black teas and darker oolongs, should steep for 3 to 5 minutes, while green, white and lighter oolong teas need just 2 to 3 minutes. Herbal tisanes and infusions have fewer tannins, so there’s less risk of oversteeping.

 

 

Tea Health Tip: Regardless of the variety of tea you brew, maximize the power of its flavonoids by drinking it freshly brewed. If you want to keep a batch of cold tea in your refrigerator, “add a little lemon juice,” recommends Jeffrey Blumberg, Ph.D., director of the Antioxidants Research Laboratory at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. The citric acid and vitamin C in that squeeze of lemon—or lime or orange—help preserve the flavonoids.

Your Body a Temple !

Your body is a temple. What you do with it and how you take care of it can directly relate to how you feel inside and out each and every day. So what can you do to help cleanse and ease this hard-working body of yours? Practicing the art of yoga and drinking soothing tea are two great things to do! That is why Sedona Yoga and Pahadi Tea have partnered together for the Sedona Yoga Festival to help your body feel as amazing as it should!

 

How does doing yoga and drinking tea relate, you ask? Both yoga and tea focus on some core necessities of the body. Yoga can lift your spirit, ease your mind, and help you recover from a long day of work. Tea can soothe your insides, elevate your energy, and on top of that, it tastes great! 

 

Yoga and Pahadi Tea both incorporate strong Indian traditions, as well. The tea sold by Pahadi Tea comes directly from the beautiful hills of Northeast India. The tea is made only from natural and fresh ingredients made by Mother Earth. When you drink Pahadi Tea, you not only receive a delicious tasting warm beverage, as you also receive the incredible energy that comes from drinking pure, organic, and natural flavors that elevate your health. Yoga, much like Pahadi Tea, focuses on you, your body, and your spiritual nature. Participating in this event can strengthen your inner consciousness and unlock your mind, body, and soul in order to receive the positivity you deserve. 

 

If you want to try something new, try practicing the art of Yoga, as well as trying out Pahadi Tea’s new products. Maharaja Chai Tea, which is an exotic flavor of herbs, fruit mélange, and spices. It has the typical spicy chai taste with a sweet apple flavor that blends together perfectly. As with everything Pahadi Tea sells, it is all natural and handpicked from Northeast India. Some of the spices that Maharaja Chai Tea incorporates include chamomile flowers, cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, apple bits, and more. Ayurvedic Tea is another new product that brings to you a delicious and healthy way to cleanse your body. It can assist you with your digestive system and help ease your anxiety. You cannot spell health without heal, so the first step to getting good health is to heal your body.

 

Trying out our different teas, such as the ones mentioned above, and practicing yoga regularly can greatly benefit your life each day. 

History and Origin of Tea in India

Although the development of tea as a thriving industry in India has been more recent, historical records indicate the prevalence of tea drinking in India since 750 BC. In the 16th century, it was also observed that people in India were preparing a vegetable dish using tea leaves with garlic and oil.

 

The ultimate thrust towards commercial tea cultivation was driven by the incorrigible tea addiction of the British. Due to this addiction, they were buying it in large quantities from the Chinese. By 1750, they were purchasing millions of pounds of tea every year from China. Even though they managed to counterbalance it with the opium trade to some extent, it was obvious that their tea addiction was getting exorbitantly expensive and unsustainable.

 

This realization led to a sustained effort by the British to understand tea production and cultivate the crop in India. In early 1774, Warren Hastings, then Governor-General of Bengal, sent a few select samples of tea seeds from China to his British emissary in Bhutan – George Bogle – for planting. Noted English botanist Sir John Banks was asked to make notes on tea in 1776, and he concluded that the British must undertake tea cultivation in India. Colonel Robert Kyd from the army regiment of the British East India Company also tried to cultivate Chinese seeds at the botanical garden that he founded (now named Indian Botanical Garden at Howrah in present day Kolkata) in 1780.

 

Meanwhile, Scottish explorer Robert Bruce made a startling discovery in 1823 when he found a native tea plant that was growing in the Upper Brahmaputra Valley and being brewed by the local Singhpho tribe. Assamese nobleman Maniram Dutta Barbhandari Baruah (also known as Maniram Dewan) gave this vital information to Robert and his brother. Maniram went on to become the first Indian to undertake private tea cultivation in Assam.

 

While Robert Bruce died before he could get the plant officially classified, his brother Charles Alexander Bruce dispatched the tea samples to the Botanical Garden at Calcutta on Christmas Eve of 1834. On closer analysis, these were officially classified as a variation of the Chinese tea plant (Camellia sinensis var sinensis). This plant was named Camellia sinensis var Assamica (Masters) Kitamura.

 

Initially, the British felt that the Assamese plant was inferior, but they later realized that the Chinese variety was unable to survive the hot weather conditions in Assam. Eventually, they decided to go ahead with the Assamese plant and by 1838, the first consignment of 12 chests of Assam tea had reached London. Subsequently Assam Company - the first joint stock tea company - was set up in London and followed by other companies like George Williamson and Jorehaut Tea Company.

 

Darjeeling was transferred to the East India Company in 1835, and the Chinese tea variant was deemed suitable for the region in 1841. Dr A Campbell was the first to plant Chinese seeds in Darjeeling that he had brought from Kumaon. Commercial plantations started in the 1850s and 113 plantations were set up in Darjeeling by 1874, covering 18,888 acres and accounting for a production of 3.9 million pounds.

 

The positive results from Assam and Darjeeling inspired many similar endeavors towards cultivating tea across the entire foothills of the Himalayas and other parts of India. By 1863, 78 plantations had been set up in Kumaon, Dehra Dun, Garhwal, Kangra Valley and Kulu. In South India, Dr Christie was the first to explore the potential of tea plantations in the Nilgiri in 1832. By 1853, India’s tea exports had reached 183.4 tons. They further soared to 6700 tons by 1870 and 35,274 tons by 1885.

 

Tea production in India has continued to prosper after 1947. The Marwari community played a key role in this regard, as many Marwaris took over tea plantations from British owners. Tea production has increased by more than 250 per cent since 1947 with the corresponding rise in area under production at around 40 per cent. India’s total tea production reached around 1,197.18 million kg in 2014-15. Of this, around 955.82 million kg (79.8 per cent) was produced in North India and 241.36 million kg (20.2 per cent) was produced in South India.

 

 

Tea - Drink of Good Health

 

First of all it is critical to understand these different tea varieties. While all of them come from the same tea plant, the difference between these varieties lies in their processing methods.

 

For preparation of green tea, the leaves are withered and then steamed or pan fired, before they are rolled and dried. This tea undergoes very little oxidation. Green tea constitutes of catechins (catechin, epicatechin, epigallocatechin, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin gallate) in monomeric form. On the other hand, during black tea manufacturing, both withering and fermentation are carried out. As a result of the oxidation process, the monomeric catechins in green leaves are converted to the aflavins (dimeric form) and the arubigins (oligomeric form) during manufacture of black tea. Flavonoids like kaempferol, quercetin and myricetin glycosides are present in both green and black tea. During the preparation of oolong tea, the leaves are partially fermented. White tea is prepared with the least processing. Immature tea leaves are picked just before their buds open completely. The name comes from the silvery fuzz covering the buds that becomes white after drying.

 

Scientific research has established a strong connection between black tea consumption and health. The human body creates millions of free radicals (molecule/atom with unpaired electron in its outer orbit) on a continuous basis in order to carry out its metabolic process. They need to be checked by antioxidant enzymes in the body or antioxidants in the food that we eat. Excessive presence of free radicals disturbs this balance and causes cell damage that leads to most chronic diseases like arthritis, emphysema and bronchitis, atherosclerosis or heart disease, peptic ulcer in the stomach, type 2 diabetes, kidney problems, liver problems and also aging, which includes wrinkling of skin.

 

Black tea polyphenols neutralize the effect of free radicals. It also has fat burning properties that help boost body metabolism and reduce appetite. Polyphenols in black tea help in the prevention of viral, bacterial and inflammatory reactions. Dimeric and oligomeric catechins present in black tea improve insulin signaling and glucose control that is beneficial in protecting the body from damages caused by excess blood sugar after the onset of type 2 diabetes. Black tea is also a vital defense against cancer and cardiovascular diseases. It has L Theanine, which improves alpha brain wave activity, thereby aiding in relaxation and bringing down stress.

 

Just like black tea, green tea is also rich in antioxidant polyphenols - catechins, flavonols, the aflavins and the arubigins. The most significant departure is the catechin epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), which is found in its highest concentration in green tea and has been found to be a powerful antioxidant. In addition, EGCg has the ability to destroy cancer cells without causing any harm to healthy tissue as well as lower LDL cholesterol and controlling the abnormal functioning of blood clots. It’s also been found to be good for bone health, oral health, weight loss and improvement in brain function.

 

Oolong tea shares common characteristics with both black tea and green tea due to its manufacturing process. It is more suitable for people who prefer a low caffeine option. White tea is considered to be a far greater source of antioxidants than green tea because the leaves undergo minimum processing.

Health Benefits:

According to the American Heart Association, researchers from the Boston University School of Medicine gave black tea to 70 people with coronary artery blockages for four weeks to study its effect on blood vessel function. At the conclusion of the study, they found that the patients' blood vessels had become nearly 50 percent more efficient. The researchers believe that the flavonoids in the tea prevent plaque from forming on artery walls, potentially protecting tea drinkers from artery diseases that result in heart attack and stroke.

- Boosts Body Immune System

- Burns calories and helps in reducing weight

- Improves blood circulation and regulates blood pressure

- Reduces risk of heart attack

- Boosts functioning in old age

- Reduces the risk of cancer

- Protects and strengthens bones

- Results in Whiter & Plaque-free Teeth

 

Tea Supply Chain - Explained!

Tea comes from an evergreen bush—Camellia Sinensis—that grows best at a fairly high altitude. It can take from 5 to 7 years after being planted for the tea bush to become suitable for commercial exploitation, after which it can remain productive for over 100 years. All types of tea—black tea, green tea, white tea, Oolong tea, etc.—are produced from the buds and leaves of the same plant; the difference is in the processing. Technically, tea is harvested all year round, but there are also certain peak seasons. For example, the highest quality (and most expensive) Darjeeling tea is plucked in April. After plucking, the tea leaves need to be delivered to a factory, preferably within 5 to 7 hours after harvesting to prevent loss of quality. Although most plantations have their own processing units, small growers need to sell their green leaf to independent Bought Leaf Factories (BLFs) or to estate factories nearby. At the processing plant, the tea leaves go through a process of drying and crushing, resulting in factory tea—also known as “made tea”. This processed tea is then sold in packets and chests through auctions and international traders, ending up at the tea blenders, retail and eventually the consumer. The tea supply chain is characterized by a very strong vertical integration by just a few multinationals. At the global level, 85% of global production is sold by multinationals. Direct links between manufacturers and producers are common. The main packers, Unilever (12% of the global market) and Tata Tea (4% of the market) are key players in the consumer market. They dominate the trade, have a strong influence on transport companies, and source part of their supplies from their own plantations.

Tea is a very labor intensive crop. Plantations and small farmers employ thousands of workers to maintain and harvest their tea fields. Work in tea gardens is usually gender specific. Harvesting, generally referred to as plucking, absorbs the most amount of labor and is carried out almost exclusively by female workers. There is typically a daily wage for tea plucking, with a stipulated minimum quantum of leaves to be plucked. Male workers are generally employed only for pruning, applying fertilizers and agrochemicals, or hauling heavy loads. As these are largely seasonal or occasional activities, men sometimes have work only for 10-15 days in the month.

Search